Soldier's best friend

Rosco, a post-traumatic stress disorder companion animal, stands behind his owner Sgt. 1st Class Jason Syriac, a military police officer with the North Carolina National Guard's Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 130th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, at his unit's armory in Charlotte, N.C., during formation, Jan. 11. Syriac, a two-time Iraq war veteran, said he hopes that by other soldiers meeting Rosco, the experience will help other service members understand the benefits of a companion animal for those with PTSD. (U.S. Army National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell, 130th Maneuver Enhanced Brigade Public Affairs/Released)

Rosco, a post-traumatic stress disorder companion animal, stands behind his owner Sgt. 1st Class Jason Syriac, a military police officer with the North Carolina National Guard’s Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 130th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, at his unit’s armory in Charlotte, N.C., during formation, Jan. 11. Syriac, a two-time Iraq war veteran, said he hopes that by other soldiers meeting Rosco, the experience will help other service members understand the benefits of a companion animal for those with PTSD. (U.S. Army National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell, 130th Maneuver Enhanced Brigade Public Affairs/Released)

One thought on “Soldier's best friend

  1. The companion dogs are a great idea. I personally have a rescued Chihuahua (11 pounds). She reacts to my PTSD symptoms’, which help me stay in check. Also, looking after her needs keep me grounded and helps me to regain my calm. I like to think that we really do help each other, she was terribly abused by her first owner.

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